Cemetery Old Section

Old Donation Historical Cemetery (Old Section)


A “V” next to the number denotes the six founders and patriots in our cemetery of the thirteen honored and listed on a new plaque along with a new gravestone for Revolutionary War Patriot Col Edward Hack Moseley JR (1743 – 1814), both dedicated by the DAR/SAR at a service and wreath-laying ceremony Saturday, May 17th, 2014.

1-V. Capt. Jonathan Saunders - 1726 – Jan 1, 1765 (stone moved from Pembroke Farms without remains)
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF
CAPT. JONATHAN SAUNDERS
who was a person of great piety and a most humane Disposition
being beneficent to all as far as his ability Reached
An easy unoffensive, obligating behavior adored all his actions
was a kind Husband tender father a sincere friend
he died universally Lamented on 21st January 1765 in the 39th year of his age.

Note: Captain Jonathan Saunders I (1726 – 1765) was the grandson of Rev. Jonathan Saunders who provided religious leadership for the growing Lynnhaven Parish Church from 1695 to 1700. Saunder's (1726 - 1765) son, Captain John Saunders II (1754 - 1834), chose to side with the British, and in 1779 he was called before the Princess Anne County Safety Committee, declared a British subject, and had the house his father had build, Pembroke Manor, confiscated. The grave of Captain John Saunders I is the oldest grave site in our cemetery.

2-V. Colonel Edward H. Moseley - (1743 - Feb. 4, 1814)
The Family Graveyard
of
Col. Edwe. H. Mosley
Who Died Feb 4, 1814
Age 71
* The above inscription was found in the Interment Record Book.
* At wreath-laying ceremony on Saturday, May 17th, 2014, the DAR/SAR celebrated a new stone since the original one had been broken off. The new inscription reads:
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF COLONEL EDWARD HACK MOSELEY, JR
1743- 1814
MEMBER OF THE HOUSE OF BURGESS
SHERIFF
VESTRYMAN
COLONIAL SOLDIER
REVOLUTIONARY WAR
PATRIOT
NORFOLK CHAPETR NSSAR
LYNNHAVEN PARISH CHAPTER
NSDAR
2014
Colonel Edward Hack. Moseley married Martha Patsy Westwood (1747 – 1824) in May 1774. Following his father, Edward was a member of the House of Burgess, a colonel and a sheriff in Princess Anne County, and a vestryman at Old Donation.

3. C.L. Shipp (Jun 23, 1833 – Apr 28, 1876)

4. Harriet Herbert (Dec 18, 1895 –  Aug 25, 1954)

5. Edward Henry Herbert (Jul 14, 1878 – Aug 24, 1943). Note: The gravestone has a stone cross atop it. He came to work with the city’s water division on July 1, 1907 and was appointed superintendent on January 17, 1933. In 1927 the worst drought in this area’s history dried up the lakes which then fed water to the city. Mr. Taylor worked to meet crisis after crisis. Through each crisis Mr. Herbert never lost his smile and his cheerful disposition. In the closing days of his life he saw completion of the giant new dam a Lake Burnt Mills, completion of the filtration plant on Thirty-fifth street, near completion of the new line from Lake Prince and other vast improvements, including a Federal water pipe line from Lake Prince to the Blackwater and Nottoway rivers. Mr. Herbert was an Old Donation vestryman where he was still superintendent of the Sunday school at the time of his death. Colonel Borland summed up the feeling at City Hall when he said: “The city has lost one of its most valuable and faithful public servants.” Virginian Pilot, 25 Aug, 1943.

6. A.T. (Buck) Herbert (Mar 11, 1913 – Aug 25, 1950)

7. Diana Talbot Walke Parks (Dec 20, 1887 – Dec 9, 1975) 
(Wife of Rufus Parks II - 1880 - 1956).  
 Sacred to the Memory of Diana Talbot Parks
 Wife of Rufus Parks
 Daughter of Richard Walke and his Wife Annie Nivison Bradford
 Born Dec 20th 1887
 Died Dec 9th 1975
Rufus and Diana joined the church just after the 1916 reconstruction.  Diana established the Altar Guild and served as its chairman until 1971. She originated the church Christmas pageant in 1926. The Parks, in the early 1920’s, invited Old Donation congregants to their home (see “Old Homes” number 29 @ http://1bob9.blogspot.com/2009/06/old-homes.html) for oyster roasts and in 1934 established Old Donation’s annual Oyster Roast and Bazaar. In 2003 the “Parks Memorial Fine Arts Series” was named in honor of the highly esteemed Parks family,  a cultural outreach comprised of local and international artists. Diana is the 11th generation descendant of our famous Sarah Thoroughgood-Gookin-Yeardley (1609 – 1657) considered the "Mother" of Lynnhaven Parish / Old Donation Church.  Her father Richard Walke (1840 - 1901) was the son of Richard Walke (1812-1871) who was the son of William Walke (1786-1882) who was the son of William Walke (1762-1795) whose brother was the famous Reverend Anthony Walke (1755 - 1814).  William was the son of Colonel Anthony Walke II (1726 - 1779) and Mary Moseley (1741 - 1795).  Mary was the daughter of Edward Hack Moseley (1717 - 1782) who was the son of Hillary Moseley (1691 - 1730) who was the son of Edward Moseley (1661-1736) who was the son of William Moseley II (1635 – 1700) and Mary Gookin (1642 - ?). Mary was the daughter of John Gookin and Sarah Offley Thoroughgood-Gookin-Yeardley (1609 – 1657), her fifth child (the only one she had after the death of her first husband). Sarah was the daughter of Robert Offley Jr. and Anne Osborne (London, England) who first married Captain Adam Thoroughgood (1604-1640). 

8. Rufus Parks II - (Mar 15, 1880 - Nov 24, 1956).
Sacred to the Memory of Rufus Parks II,
Son of Rufus Parks I and his wife Aline Petty;
Born March 15th 1880, Died Nov 24th 1956.
Rufus Parks II was the husband of Diana Talbot Walke. They had two sons, Littleton Walke Parks (1915 - 2007) and N. Gorham Parks of Pittsford, N.Y.; and two daughters, Ann Nivison Bradford Parks (1917 - 2002) and Diana Talbot Parks Hill (1920 – 2000).  Littleton’s son Rufus lives today in Virginia Beach.

9. Betty Thorougood – (1747 – 1808)
In Memory of
BETTY
daughter of Lemuel Thourougood
Born 1712 and married Wm. Moseley in 1768
and died in 1808
Her daughter Mary Moseley
married Francis Moore of Moore's Bridges
and their daughter Betty Thorougood
married James Curiel in 1818
Note: Her husband William Moseley and Colonel Edward H. Moseley JR (1743 - 1814) share the same Great-Great-Grandfather, William Moseley (1635-1700), who emigrated to Princess Anne Co from Rotterdam, Holland. Their relationship is as follows:
                         William I (1601-1655)  - Suzanna
                          William II (1635-1700) - Mary Gookin (1635 -?)
John (1670-1739)                                           Edward (1661-1736) -                        
Anthony (1689-?)                                           Hillary (1691-1730)
Francis                                                              Edward Hack (1717-1782)
William married  Betty Thorougood           Col. Edward Hack JR (1743- 1814)

10-V. John Henderson - (1769 – 1825)  
In Memory of
John Henderson
a native of Northampton County
Eastern Shore, Va
Who died in this County
February 1825
Aged about 56 years
Note: Less than a month after America declared war on England, on July 10, 1812 Sgt John Brownley, Pvt John Henderson  and Pvt Anthony Walke, our three War of 1812 celebrated patriots, as members of the Princess Ann County Militia, participated in capturing an English ship off Cape Henry, the first ship captured in the war. Then a half year later the Militia took a crew of 24 men prisoner and turned them over to the local marshal. The Militia had skirmishes with British landing parties throughout the war. See “Moseley Grave Ceremony” @ http://1bob9.blogspot.com/2009/06/commemorating-colonel-edward-hack.html

11. Nancy Kellam - (April 1789 – May 1789)
Here lies interred the remains of Nancy Kellam, daughter of Captain Henry and Mrs. Hannah Kellam, who departed this life on the 7th day of May, 1789. Aged 5 weeks.
Note: Her grave was moved from a family cemetery in the Hilltop section of Virginia Beach. There is a foot marker - "N. K. 1789." The skull engraved at the top of the marker is recognition of grief for the infant's death. 

12. Capt. Henry Kellam   
Capt. Henry Kellam – Died Approximately 1790 
Note: His wife and his daughter's graves are marked a brick foundation slab within three feet of each other. A fence was put there to enclose the graves and the air conditioning units by John Robert Settle IV. The stones were moved from Pembroke Farms without remains. The Interment Record Book, a record kept in the Church Office as developed by Ann Parks (1917 – 2002), shows his grave to be a 4X8 slab. Since there are no visible markings on the slab, the slab has been listed as “unknown.” Other source of information: Colonial, Land, Bible Records - “John Saunders, 1 March 1781, Henry Kellam grantee 800 acres escheat land, parish of Lynnhaven Formerly the property of John Saunders. Beg.g &c. on a cove of the river dividing this land from the land of Mrs. Tenants. Princess Anne County.”

13. William Walke – (1762 - Jan 1, 1795) (stone without remains moved from Ferry Plantations graveyard)
Here Lay the Remains
Of
William Walke
Late a Magistrate and Representative
Of this County
Who Departed This Life
The First of Jan 1795
Aged 35 Years
In life Esteemed in death Lamented
Note: William was the grandson of Anthony I (1692- 1768) (below #15) and son of Colonel Anthony Walke II (1726 - 1779) (most likely below #14)

14.  Reverend Anthony Walke (1755 - 1814) was the son of Colonel Anthony Walke II. He married Anne McColley McClenahan on January 15, 1776 and had six children: Anne M., Edwin, Jane Eliza, David Meade, Susan, and Anthony IV (1778 - 1820). On July 13, 1805, five months after Anne died, he married Anne Newton Fisher (1774 - 1840). The Revolutionary War (1775–1783) caught Reverend Walke at a time when he was coming of age into a Virginia gentry threatened by the loss of political power, wealth, and social prestige made possible by English control over the Virginia Colony. In his writings he blamed the north and their foolish Boston Tea Party actions. Reverend Walke was a representative to the Virginia Constitutional Convention, and after the Revolutionary War, in early 1788 he was ordained a priest of the Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, and then served the following year as an elector from the State of Virginia to the first presidential election held in Philadelphia. Returning to Princess Anne County, Reverend Walke, with a large inheritance from his father, presided as rector over Lynnhaven Parish Church for many years without a salary (from 1788 to 1800 and again from 1812 to 1813). Reverend Walke divided his time between preaching and the hunt. Not only was he noted for delivering sermons with a captivating mild mannered voice, but a more picturesque side of him was his love of fox and deer hunting. He conducted sermons with his horse Silverheels tethered near the door of the church. When he heard those hunting horns, he would immediately turn the service over to his clerk, Dick Edwards, and hurry off on Silverheels, not seen again until late in the day.
Note. One of the nine Walke tomb stones moved here from Fairfields in Kempsville and the Ferry Farm was unknown to Ann Parks. She titled it just “Walke” in her cemetery record book. Because of the size of the stone and its dated age, Walke Historian Elizabeth Vogt and I began piecing together facts that were conclusive in discovering that this stone was in fact our famous Rev. Anthony Walke whose stone is next to his grandfather’s, Colonel Anthony Walke I - (1692 - Nov 8, 1768) (the large vault) even though the stone was placed here by Ann without knowing this. Also note the date of death should be Aug 14, 1814, not Aug 14, 1815 (by Bob Perrine, Church Historian).


Rev Anthony Walke (1755-1815)

15-V. Colonel Anthony Walke I - (1692 - Nov 8, 1768) His large vault (see below) was moved from Walke family cemetery at the old family plantation, “Fairfields,” in Kempsville).
A sincere friend and cheerful companion
Steady in the Practice of Christianity
and a zealous promoter of Virtue
he was for many years a member
of the House of Burgesses
and Judge of the Court of this County
in his public capacity he behaved himself
with a uniform regard to Justice
tempered with mercy and in all respects
consulted with interests of the county
over which he presided.




16. Lucille L. Garner –  (Sep 18, 1920 – Jul 8, 2004).  Lucille served as a volunteer at the Dioceses office, Talbot Hall, was a member of the Virginia Symphony League, and was a founding and life time member of the Old Dominion University Friends of the Library Association. She retired as Librarian Emeritus from Old Dominion University after serving as a reference librarian for over 20 years. She was predeceased by her husband, and by her daughter, Adair Gallagher. She also leaves 12 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren, 2 nephews, and many cousins and friends in Texas and Virginia.

17. William H. Garner – (Aug 21, 1917 – Dec 14, 1966). In the early 1960’s William Garner was the junior warden of ODEC. Following the recognition of major church building structural problems in 1965, Bill helped oversee the repair program. In that capacity he worked with Henry Keeling. Major improvements included rehabilitating the church roof, tying in the walls with steel rods across the congregational area, strengthening the balcony, removing pews out of the front and moving the altar rail out.

18. Sarah Livingston Walke – (Apr 1819 - Sep 26, 1819) (stone moved without remains from Walke family cemetery at the old family plantation, “Fairfields,” in Kempsville).
Sacred
To The memory of
Sarah Livingston
Daughter of Anth. &n Anne Walke
Who Departed this Life
Sept. 26, 1819
Aged 5 Months

19. Anne Tabitha Walke - (Jun 1817 - Aug 4th, 1837) (stone moved without remains from Walke family cemetery at the old family plantation, “Fairfields,” in Kempsville).
Sacred
To The memory of
Anne Tabitha
Daughter of
Anth. &n Anne Walke
Who Departed this Life
Age 20 yrs. & 2 months.

20.  Anthony Walke - (Apr 1812 - Jan 2, 1833) (stone moved without remains from Walke family cemetery at the old family plantation, “Fairfields,” in Kempsville).
Sacred
To The memory of
Anthony -  son of Anth. & Anne Walke
Who departed This Life
Jan 2, 1833
Aged 20 yrs & 9 mos.

Note: There are two stones behind No 20 with no available information. One has the letters L E J.

21-V. Pvt. Anthony Walke – (Feb 1778 - Sept 13, 1820) (Great Grandson of Colonel Walke I) (stone moved without remains from Walke family cemetery at the old family plantation, “Fairfields,” in Kempsville).
Sacred
To the memory of
Anthony Walke
Who departed this life
Sep 13, 1820
Aged 42 yrs & 8 mos.
Note: Less than a month after America declared war on England, on July 10, 1812 Sgt John Brownley, Pvt John Henderson  and Pvt Anthony Walke, our three War of 1812 celebrated patriots, as members of the Princess Ann County Militia, participated in capturing an English ship off Cape Henry, the first ship captured in the war. Then a half year later the Militia took a crew of 24 men prisoner and turned them over to the local marshal. The Militia had skirmishes with British landing parties throughout the war. See “Moseley Grave Ceremony” @ http://1bob9.blogspot.com/2009/06/commemorating-colonel-edward-hack.html

22. Ann Tabetha Walke - ( Aug 1841 - Oct 3, 1842). Infant daughter Ann Tabitha of James R. & Angelena Walke -(moved from Walke family cemetery at the old family plantation, “Fairfields,” in Kempsville).
Sacred
To the memory of
Ann Tabetha
Infant Daughter of Anth. And Angelina
Died Oct 3, 1842
Age 14 mos.

23. Anne T. Walke – Sept 30, 1817 (stone moved without remains from Walke family cemetery at the old family plantation, “Fairfields,” in Kempsville).
Sacred
To the Memory of
Anne T. – Daughter of
Anth. & Anne Walke
Who Departed this life
Sept 30, 1817

24. Walke (no information). The headstone epitaph (5 lines) has weathered away with only the top line distinguishable, i.e. "Aged 10 Years." (moved from Walke family cemetery at the old family plantation, “Fairfields,” in Kempsville). See 14th listed grave @ Carol’s House, Old Donation Cemetery.   http://www.carolshouse.com/cemeteryrecords/olddonation


25. David M. Walke –  (Jan 26, 1800 – June 9, 1854)  
He was a firm believer in Christianity and in the Holy Scriptures, but acknowledges with shame, having fallen far short of living in strict obedience to its holy Precepts and commandments
Note: This is the most formidable gravestone being the tallest grave stone in the cemetery.
See below \/

26. James Rudolph Hodges -  (June 26, 1910 – Oct 25, 1951)
James Hodges
Tec 5 2 Coast Artillery
World War II
June 26, 1910 – Oct 25, 1951

27. William E. Biddle - (Nov 6, 1856 - April 1, 1915)
In Memory of William E. Biddle
Born Nov 6, 1856
Died April 1, 1915
 The song “Death Is Only a Dream,” by C.W. Ray, 1892 is inscribed on his tomb.

28. Ann Butt Biddle -  (1857 - 1933) Wife of William E. Biddle.

29. Ann Brownley – (1780 - Oct 8, 1853)
Anna
Wife of Jno. Browley
Born in 1780
Died October, 1853

30-V.  Jno. (John) Brownley – (1780 - Sep 28, 1819)  
Note: Less than a month after America declared war on England, on July 10, 1812 Sgt John Brownley, Pvt John Henderson  and Pvt Anthony Walke, our three War of 1812 celebrated patriots, as members of the Princess Ann County Militia, participated in capturing an English ship off Cape Henry, the first ship captured in the war. Then a half year later the Militia took a crew of 24 men prisoner and turned them over to the local marshal. The Militia had skirmishes with British landing parties throughout the war. See “Moseley Grave Ceremony” @ http://1bob9.blogspot.com/2009/06/commemorating-colonel-edward-hack.html
note: Ann Brownley's gravestone (no. 29) had been mistaken for John's (no. 30). A dig on 6 April 2016 found the stub of his gravestone The stone was found in the church shed behind some old boards and glued to the stub by Sexton Bob Reneau.

31. William Dixon – (1807 - 1853) partially buried in a tree - see below \/
DIED FEB 16, 1853
AGED 46. YEARS


32. Sarah Dixon – (1812 – 1873) - see above /\
IN MEMORY OF OUR BELOVED MOTHER
SARAH
WIFE OF
WILLIAM DIXON
DIED FEB 16, 1873
AGED 61 YEARS
Note: (the marker was broken off and only a stub is barely visible next to her husband’s marker. In April 2016 the stone was found in the church shed behind some old boards and glued to the stub by Sexton Bob Reneau.)

33.  Fannie Williams – (1829 - 1901)
Fannie
Wife of John Williams
Born Sep 28, 1829
Died Oct 31, 1901
(at rest)


1701 - James Sherwood – Section C (most likely - no stone) - 1660 - Aug 15, 1701.
IN MEMORIE OF
JAMES SHERWOODE
WHOSE SOULE HAS GONE
TO GOD
HIS BODIE WAYTING JUDGMENT
DAY
RESTS HEERE BENEATHE THIS
SOD
THE 15TH AUGUST, 1701
HE METT HIS EARTHLIE ENDE
AGED 42
AND TREWLIE MOURNED
AS HUSBAND FATHER FRENDE
Note: The above tombstone inscription was published in the Virginian Pilot, June 1, 1941, by Rogers Dey Whichard.  The article makes known what was written on his grave stone in the spelling of 1701. Mr. Whichard says James Sherwood was laid to rest  in the historical Old Donation Cemetery. His tombstone has been lost, most likely when church 3 was built in  1733-36.  James married 20 year old Grace White (1660 - 1740) in the spring of 1680 at the first Lynnhaven Parish Church at today’s 1625 Spring House Trail, Virginia (Church Point).  Grace is best known today as the Witch of Pungo.  Grace’s father John White gave a patent of 50 acres of land as a wedding gift to his son-in-law.  A year later John White died, leaving the rest of his land (145 acres) to James and Grace.  The Sherwoods had three sons - John, James, and Richard, and lived on a farm in Pungo, a community in Lower Norfolk County (Princess Anne County after 1691).  In 1698 James sued neighbors John and Jane Gisburne and Anthony and Elizabeth Barnes for accusing his wife Grace of witch craft but lost both cases. Whispers persisted about Grace being a witch, a jealous consequence of a few local women who saw Grace as a non-conformist. Grace was not the typical wife of those times, but James encouraged the free spirit in her. The early death of James left Grace without his protection, ultimately resulting in the witch trial and jail for poor Grace. The location of James Sherwood’s burial site had not generally been known until Old Donation Church member Belinda Nash revealed this information in her 2012 book, “A Place in Time, the Story of the Witch of Pungo - Grace Sherwood.”  
Bob Perrine, Old Donation Church Historian.
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Walke Genealogy (# - indicates grave number). Of twelve Walke grave stones, ten are in the historical section and two are in the In-ground Columbarium. Nine were moved here from Fairfields in Kempsville and the Ferry Farm.  Diana Talbot Walke Parks (Dec 20, 1887 – Dec 9, 1975) (#7) with remains was not moved here. Also the large vault of Colonel Anthony Walke I (1692 - 1768) was moved with remains.  Sometime in the 1930’s Ann Talbot Parks (daughter of Rufus and Diana Talbot Parks) and members of the Princess Anne Garden Club moved the Walke family grave stones to the Old Donation Cemetery. They found the Fairfields Walke Cemetery enclosure in a hog pen where the hogs were systematically destroying the markers. At Ferry Farm, houses were literally built over Walke remains. Here is a genealogy of those Walkes, their descendants, and some Walkes of interest. Ann (space 54) and her brother, Littleton (space 52), with remains, are buried in the In-ground Columbarium

1st – Colonel Thomas Walke I (1642 – 1694) was an immigrant from British-ruled Barbados. He  married Mary Lawson in 1690, also an emigrate from Barbados. Thomas died only four years after his marriage, leaving three children, Thomas II or Jr. (1691-1723), Anthony I (1692- 1768), and Mary.  Thomas held colonial distinction and was commissioned a colonel by the Governor of Virginia. He made his fortune shipping goods to Barbados from Hampton Roads and slaves back to Hampton Roads from Barbados. Four years after his death, his executors in 1697 purchased land for the construction of a home for Walke’s children. Fairfields Manor House (1699 – 1865) was built near today's 643 E Fox Grove Ct, Virginia Beach, VA 23464 (just north of Fairfield Shopping Center). Fairfields was a grand house with dozens of black slaves, blacksmiths, wagon-makers, saddlers, and tradesmen imported from England. Fairfields belonged to five generations of Walkes until it was destroyed by fire March 1865.

Thomas Walke I’s two sons.

2nd – Thomas Walke II (1691 – 1723)  was the first son of Thomas Walke I and his wife Mary Lawson.

3rd – Thomas Walke III (1720 – 1761) was the first son of Thomas Walke II and was the
first Walke to leave Fairfields Manor House and build on large land holdings acquired by the Walkes - Upper Wolfsnare (1762 – present) at 2040 Potters Road  (first called the Brick House) was on a creek that emptied into the East Lynnhaven River 7 miles south of the Chesapeake Bay inlet. Thomas III began construction of the Georgian style home in 1759 at the age of 39. It was completed three years later, one year after his death. At his death he owned 7,000 acres of land and 55 slaves.

4th – Thomas Walke IV (1760 – 1797) was the only child of Thomas Walke III and his second wife, Mary Ann Thorowgood. Thomas IV resided at the Brick House as a teenager during the Revolutionary War that was fought between 1775 and 1783. He and his distant cousin Rev. Anthony Walke, III (1755 – 1814) were selected at the Kempsville County Seat to represent Princes Anne County at the 1788 Richmond convention out-polling 71 year old Lt. Col Edward Hack Moseley (1717-1782) and 70 year old Thomas Kempe (descendant of William Kempe, one of 105 indentured servants brought to Lynnhaven Parish by Adam Thoroughgood between 1628 and 1635). Moseley and Kempe were loyal to King George III enjoying the social life under Virginia’s Governor, Lord Dunmore right up to 1775 when he was forced out of Virginia in skirmishes that led to the Revolutionary War. They would have probably voted against the new constitution, but the much younger 28 year old Thomas Walke and 33 year old Anthony Walke, having already held positions of leadership as justice of the county court and delegate to the General Assembly, handily beat Edward Moseley and Thomas Kempe; and along with other lower Tidewater delegates supported ratification of the Articles of Confederation at the 1788 Richmond convention by a narrow 89 to 79 winning margin.

2nd – (#15) Col Anthony Walke I (1692 – 1768) was the second son of Thomas Walke I

3rd - Colonel Anthony Walke II (1726 – 1779) was the second child of Col Anthony Walke I and his 
4th wife Ann Lee.                       
 http://www.jonesgenealogy.net/getperson.php?personID=I702&tree=Jones

4th – (#13) William Walke (1762 – 1795) was the 4th child of Colonel Anthony Walke II and his 2nd wife Mary Moseley (1741 – 1795). He was the second Walke to leave Fairfields Manor (23 years after his first cousin, once removed, Thomas Walke III left) to build the 1st Ferry Plantation House (1782 – 1828) at 4136 Cheswick Lane (called the Walke Manor House) for his 27 year old half brother  Reverend Anthony Walke (1755 – 1814) beside possibly some or all of his five children born between 1780 and 1790.  The home was situated on the West Lynnhaven River 5 miles south of the Chesapeake Bay inlet. http://www.jonesgenealogy.net/getperson.php?personID=I675&tree=Jones

5th - Elizabeth Mason Walke (1784-1855) was the 2nd child of William Walke (1762 – 1795).  She grew up at the 1st Ferry Plantation House and married 32 year old George F. McIntosh (1768-1863) in 1800 when she was only 16. They courted during  excursions on barges to Cape Henry shoreline having sent servants ahead with tents, furniture and refreshments. They had what was headlines as the “Wedding of the Century,” a most grand affair at the small Lynnhaven Parish Church with days of celebration at Ferry Plantation.  After their marriage Elisabeth moved in with McIntosh at Summerville, just across the river from Ferry Plantation, leaving Ferry Plantation for David Meade. Summerville in Thalia was a large manor house requiring sixteen slaves to work the plantation.  McIntosh rebuilt his father-in-law’s Ferry Plantation House in 1830, a smaller house from the 1st one.
http://www.jonesgenealogy.net/getperson.php?personID=I8660&tree=Jones


5th William Walke (1787-1882) was the 4th child of William Walke (1762-1795)
http://www.jonesgenealogy.net/getperson.php?personID=I669&tree=Jones 

6th Richard Walke (1812-1872) was the 2nd son of William Walke (1787-1882)

6th Rev Lewis Walke (1819 – unknown) was the 3rd son of William Walke (1787 - 1882). He was the last Old Donation preacher prior to the church being abandoned for services in 1856 in favor of Emanuel Episcopal Church, Kempsville. Of possible causes, the most probable was the shift of the population center from a silted up Lynnhaven River to a much better Elizabeth River navigation channel. Another reason noted in 1855 by author Bishop William Meade (1789-1862) who wrote about the former and vibrant Lynnhaven Parish - “bankruptcy and ruin and untimely death of those who once formed the gay society of this county. Cards, the bottle, the horse-race, the continual; feasts - these were the destroyers.

7th Richard Walke (1840 - 1901) was the 2nd son of Richard Walke (1812-1871)
http://www.jonesgenealogy.net/getperson.php?personID=I55&tree=Jones

8th (#7) Diana Talbot Walke Parks (Dec 20, 1887 – Dec 9, 1975)
(Wife of Rufus Parks II - 1880 - 1956) was the daughter of Richard Walke (1840 - 1901) and is the 11th generation descendant of our famous Sarah Thoroughgood-Gookin-Yeardley (1609 – 1657) considered the "Mother" of Lynnhaven Parish / Old Donation Church. 

4th - #14 Rev. Anthony Walke, III (1755 – 1814) was the only child of Colonel Anthony Walke II (1726 – 1779) and his first wife Jane Randolph (1729 – 1756).  He was the famous Lynnhaven Parish Church preacher who divided his time between preaching and the hunt.

5th – (#25) David Meade Walke (1800 – 1854) was the 6th child of Rev. Anthony Walke, III and his wife Anne McCalley McClennahan. He used the Walke Manor House for gambling parties. At one of them, in 1828, a drunk guest tipped over an oil lamp and burned the plantation to the ground.  http://www.jonesgenealogy.net/getperson.php?personID=I8609&tree=Jones

5th – (#21) Pvt. Anthony Walke, IV (1778 – 1820) was the 5th  child of Rev. Anthony Walke, III and his 1st wife Anne McCalley McClennahan, 

Children of Pvt. Anthony Walke, IV (1778 – 1820) and his 2nd wife Ann Livingston
6th – (#18) Sarah Livingston Walke (1819 – 1819)
6th – (#23) Anne T. Walke – (1814 -1817)
6th    (#19) Anne Tabitha Walke (1817 – 1837)
6th – (#20) Anthony Walke, V (1812 – 1833)


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